Slow-Roasting Tomatoes

 

Plum Ts and toes

This year I have a very big crop of Fiaschetto di Manduria, an Italian plum tomato from Uprising Seeds. I grew this variety for the first time last year, attracted by the catalog description emphasizing its adaptation to our climate, its 2-3 ounce size, productivity, suitability for drying and determinate habit. Because of the advertized determinate habit, I grew last year’s plants in the cold frame where they produced well despite outgrowing the cold frame’s protection, and the manageable-sized crop made nice dried tomatoes. This year I grew a few more plants, six instead of four, and planted them in the greenhouse. Yikes! In this warmer environment, they grew twice as tall (definitely not your standard determinate habit), spread out in all directions, and produced at least four times as many tomatoes as last year’s plants. Now I understand the warning in the catalog description: “These small, 2-3 oz, plum shaped tomatoes…hang like grapes from the bushy determinate plants in such prolific quantities that we eventually had to just stop picking them because we couldn’t keep up with the processing.”

Luckily, I haven’t had to give up on picking. Just as the plants were sinking under the weight of ripening tomatoes, I found a great way to keep up with the processing. A September 6, 2017 Food 52 column titled “Molly Wizenberg’s Slow-Roasted Tomatoes with Sea Salt & Ground Coriander” arrived in my email just as the harvest was getting overwhelming. I remembered hearing about this recipe from Orangette years ago and I was grateful to be reminded of it again. As the author of this Food 52 column notes: “This is the single most genius thing you can do to a tomato. They’re best and most outrageous when made with ripe Romas or other meaty types, but as Wizenberg points out, slow-roasting will bring out the tomato in even the pale and off-season, if you feel the need. Make a lot. They keep for a week in the fridge, and are just fine in the freezer. Adapted slightly from Orangette and A Homemade Life (Simon & Schuster, 2009).”

Here’s the recipe:

drying plum Ts set up

Makes as many tomatoes as you want to cook

 Ripe tomatoes, preferably Roma

Olive oil

Salt

Ground coriander

Heat the oven to 200° F. Wash the tomatoes, cut out the dry scarred spot from the stem with the tip of a paring knife, and halve the tomatoes lengthwise. Pour a bit of olive oil into a small bowl, dip a pastry brush into it, and brush the tomato halves lightly with oil. Place them, skin side down, on a large baking sheet. Sprinkle them with sea salt and ground coriander—about a pinch of each for every four to six tomato halves.

Bake the tomatoes until they shrink to about 1/3 of their original size but are still soft and juicy, 4 to 6 hours. Remove the baking sheet from the oven, and allow the tomatoes to cool to room temperature. Place them in an airtight container, and store them in the refrigerator.

Dried tomatoes in pans

Still warm on the baking sheet, these slow-roasted tomatoes are amazingly delicious. It’s very easy to stand there and snack on them. The ground coriander is a subtle but perfect flavor addition, providing slightly nutty, very slightly curry overtones to the tomato’s sweetness. They are lovely as an appetizer with cheese and bread. Lightly chopped or pureed, they would make a perfect sauce for pasta or roasted vegetables. I’ve already roasted enough tomatoes to pack eight pint-jars for the freezer and will fill a few more jars with the last of the harvest. They will be a highlight of this winter’s meals.

Dried tomatoes in jars

And if you don’t have plum tomatoes to roast, cherry tomatoes, larger plum tomatoes like Speckled Roman or Amish Paste, or even big, lumpy heirlooms like Brandywine, Mortgage Lifter or Pruden’s Purple all roast well with this technique. I roasted a pan of Sunchocola and Orange Paruche cherry tomatoes the other day, transforming them into concentrated tomato-flavor treats.

drying cherry Ts terracotta

I also tried small a pan of Speckled Roman and Amish Paste and one Mortgage Lifter, equally delicious and already packed into freezer jars for winter.

Will I grow Fiaschetto di Manduria in the greenhouse next year? Yes, but no more than six plants.

 

 

 

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4 thoughts on “Slow-Roasting Tomatoes

  1. I love tomatoes but am having to give them up to see if doing so reduces the arthritis inflammation in my neck. Also potatoes, eggplant and even peppers. Hoping it will be temporary. 😕

    But I love getting these messages. Thanks.

    Love and blessings,

    Lorna

    On Mon, Sep 25, 2017 at 11:59 AM, Lopez Island Kitchen Gardens wrote:

    > Lopez Island Kitchen Gardens posted: ” This year I have a very big crop > of Fiaschetto di Manduria, an Italian plum tomato from Uprising Seeds. I > grew this variety for the first time last year, attracted by the catalog > description emphasizing its adaptation to our climate, its 2-3 oun” >

  2. Hi Debby!
    Great idea for us to try. We’ve been roasting tomatoes for days with onion, garlic and diced jalapeño. The house smells amazing! Just used the sauce from our roasting over our poblano chile relleno stuffed with potatoes and cheese…. so delicious! Good year for tomatoes and peppers!
    Anne

  3. Hi Debbie,

    These entries of yours are such a wonderful gift to all of us! Thank you so much. The tomato article is particularly inspiring considering my present activity.

    Today, Pamela Pauly and I are building footings for a long anticipated greenhouse. I wonder if you might allow me to come and visit your greenhouse and to pick your brain a bit about design features.

    So looking forward to tomatoes next year!

    Thanks, Karen

    On Sep 25, 2017 11:59 AM, “Lopez Island Kitchen Gardens” wrote:

    > Lopez Island Kitchen Gardens posted: ” This year I have a very big crop > of Fiaschetto di Manduria, an Italian plum tomato from Uprising Seeds. I > grew this variety for the first time last year, attracted by the catalog > description emphasizing its adaptation to our climate, its 2-3 oun” >

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